What are Life Skill goals?

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Overall goals to:

• Establish learning behaviours that create success in the classroom and on the job
• Self – regulate thinking and self -organise behaviour
• Use proactive thinking and problem-solving.

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As a Speech Language Pathologist our vision is to see students equipped in their own learning to better prepare for school life and beyond.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]As students advance through the grades, their academic performance is increasingly dependent on their ability to
• organise
• prioritise complex information,
• shift flexibly,
• access working memory
• self-monitor,
• all critically important executive function processes

Many students, especially those with learning and attention difficulties, become less productive in secondary school because they have not learned the strategies needed to access these important executive function processes.

Executive functioning skills continue to develop through the teen years until early 20’s. By taking steps to tackle executive functioning issues while children are young, they can reach their full potential.

 

Middle Kids

• Improve planning and organisation skills
• Improve the ability to effectively carryout plans to complete tasks
• Use self-evaluation strategies to monitor progress
• Slowly extend the length of activities.
• Include child in group & class activities.
• Encourage child to carry on with activity while they listen to the speaker.
• Memorising facts, including rehearsal and associative strategies
• Organising information, including categorisation and flow charting
• Questioning to increase comprehension

 

Young People

As your child’s brain continues to develop, the symptoms of executive functioning issues may change. Early intervention can help you find ways to use your child’s strengths to support weaknesses starting when he’s young. Executive functioning skills continue to develop through the teen years until early 20’s. By taking steps to tackle executive functioning issues while children are young, they can reach their full potential.

Initiating: strategies for getting started, such as “get going”, sequences, and steps.
Time Management: estimating time for planning homework, long-term assignments, and tests
Planning & Organisation: brainstorming, notes and information, reading with a purpose, and writing efficiently
Working Memory: chunking and rehearsing, linking and associations, acronyms and silly sentences, paraphrasing, and visualising
Flexible Thinking: reorder or rewrite sentences and paragraphs, homographs, intonation and stress
Self-Monitoring: checking for mistakes, editing written work, identifying key words in directions, and combining information.

Overall
• Establish learning behaviours that create success in the classroom and on the job
• Self – regulate thinking and self -organize behaviour
• Use proactive thinking and problem-solving.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]